Find Your Folklife

We are “the folk,” all of us.

The Nevada Arts Council’s Folklife Friends and Neighbors Initiative is about you—your family, your neighbors, your friends, your community. It’s also about us—who we are as Nevadans navigating the challenges and opportunities of the 21st Century.

Folklife, folk arts, and folklore all spring from cultural identity, which comes from belonging to a social group. Family heritage—national or ethnic—often informs a person’s sense of self. Cultural identity may also derive from language, gender, religion, age, occupation, and locality or sense of place. Folk traditions are typically shared in informal ways and passed from one person to another by word of mouth, imitation, or observation.

Culture is something we share with others in a social group. It’s our folklife: our common values and beliefs, the creative ways we express identity in a group, the knowledge we share, the objects that hold significance and meaning, the activities we engage in as a community. Most people belong to many different “folk groups” or communities. Every person is unique. Depending on where you are and who you are with, you may express different aspects of your own cultural identity.  Join us in a quest to “find your folklife”—and share on social media with the hashtag #NVFolkFAN.

Over the past three years we have been photographing Nevadans—your friends and neighbors—as they appear when representing cultural identity and as they appear in their everyday lives at home, on the job, or enjoying recreational activities. That work is represented in the 22 “lenticular two-flip” panels of this exhibition.  To find out more about lenticular art, click here.

This exhibit will be available to view in person at the Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas from 5th September 2021

Discover the people and their stories… Para descubrir más sobre esta exposición, haga clic aquí


Traditional dance performances were the highlight…

Aisha Virender Sanwal, Friends of India, Las Vegas


 

I represent the Guerrero Aguila

Anastacio Duran, Danza Azteca Aztlan, Sparks


 

I play the bagpipes at funerals…

Andrew Fusco, Las Vegas Pipe Band, Las Vegas

 


We wear the sablay

Arabelle Panganiban, Kalahi Philippine Folkloric Ensemble, Las Vegas

 


 

The Tunantada is a dance/drama…

Arturo Amaya, Las Vegas Peruvian Cultural Heritage Association, Henderson


 

I’m a burlesque performer…

Buttercup, Burlesque Hall of Fame, Las Vegas

 

 


The charreria is who we are…

Carolina Vargas, Las Escaramuzas Perlas de Nevada, Silver Springs


 

I’m Basque on my dad’s side…

Jackquelyn Urain,  Euskaldunak Danak Bat, Winnemucca


 

The Lion Dance is a tradition…

JoeyRoss DeChavez, Lohan School of Shaolin, Las Vegas

 

 


 

Everybody wants to be Irish…

Mike Neville, Sons and Daughters of Erin, Las Vegas


 

I grew up in Puerto Rico…

Monica Ortiz, Puerto Rican Association of Las Vegas, Las Vegas


 

In Cote d’Ivoire

Norbert Yao, Anouaze Beat, Carson City

 

 


 

I grew up in Japan…

Noriko Carroll, Kizuna Japanese Society, Las Vegas

 


 

I’m Norwegian, Swedish, Danish…

Richard Senzig, Sons of Norway, Las Vegas


 

The Holy Ghost Festa…

Savana Manha, Portuguese Pentecostal Festa, Fallon

 

 


I work inside Hoover Dam…

Shawn Lynch, Hydroelectric Mechanic Supervisor, Hoover Dam, Boulder City

 


 

I am a Kumu Hula

Sheldeen Kaleimomi Haleamau, Halau Hula O’Kaleimomi, Las Vegas


 

I’m a ranch wife…

Thaysha Groves, Groves Cattle Company, Deeth

 

 


 

I created a Native American superhero…

Theo Tso, Las Vegas Paiute Tribe, Las Vegas

 


 

I’m a grass dancer…

Tristin Ike, Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone, Elko


I work in a gold mine…

T.J. Ladner, Mobile Maintenance Welder, Kinross Round Mountain Gold Corporation

 

 


 

People respond to Wolfie Jr…

Alex Daw, University of Nevada-Reno

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